bibliophilicwitch:

indigobluerose:

openbookstore:

So dramatic!

This has made me laugh really loudly, twice.

I’M FUCKING PRINTING THIS AND POSTING IT EVERYWHERE

bibliophilicwitch:

indigobluerose:

openbookstore:

So dramatic!

This has made me laugh really loudly, twice.

I’M FUCKING PRINTING THIS AND POSTING IT EVERYWHERE

korranation:

Hey Korra Nation, BIG NEWS!!!
IF THIS PICTURE (drawn by the one-and-only Bryan K) GETS OVER 15,000 NOTES, WE’LL RELEASE OUR FIRST EXCLUSIVE CLIP FROM BOOK 4 ONLINE TOMORROW MORNING!
So what’re you waiting for? Let’s do this!!!

korranation:

Hey Korra Nation, BIG NEWS!!!

IF THIS PICTURE (drawn by the one-and-only Bryan K) GETS OVER 15,000 NOTES, WE’LL RELEASE OUR FIRST EXCLUSIVE CLIP FROM BOOK 4 ONLINE TOMORROW MORNING!

So what’re you waiting for? Let’s do this!!!

ricelily:

All these pages are 8.5x11, 300 dpi. Feel free to print it out in full size if you like physical copies

Comics and Comic Artists

Jake Wyatt- deviantart tumblr

"Welcome To Summers"

"Soliloquy"

Suggested Reading/Books:

Scott McCloud’s “Making Comics” (entirely done in comic format)

Exercises/Practices/Tutorials:

Lettering

Speech Bubbles Mistakes

Paint Bucket Resource

Storyboarding and Camera angles

What is DPI?

Transferring Traditional to Digital (Photoshop Tutorial)

legion-of-scouts-and-monsters:

julystorms:

theheadlessgirl:

Nobody really wants Erwin’s job.

Whoa this is really powerful.

Thank fuck he lost his arm then

legion-of-scouts-and-monsters:

julystorms:

theheadlessgirl:

Nobody really wants Erwin’s job.

Whoa this is really powerful.

Thank fuck he lost his arm then

the-momofukuu:

Folk Dolls.
Costumes from Poland.

the-momofukuu:

Folk Dolls.

Costumes from Poland.

(Źródło: momofukuu.deviantart.com)

semiticsemantics:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:
You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. 
People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

semiticsemantics:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.

His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.

He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.

He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.

Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.

It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:

You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent.

People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.

He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

kinkstertime:

This whole bit is made all the funnier by knowing that all of the guards were just random extras who weren’t told what was going to happen only that they weren’t allowed laugh at any cost as they wouldn’t be payed if they did.

(Źródło: betterlucknext)

Sweethearts together…

Sweethearts together…

  

shortcuttothestars:

theidiotbastardson:

Uriah Heep - The Wizard

Just remembered this song, it’s so freaking awesome!

Uriah Heep is so freaking awsome…

Rumplestiltskin.
Forgive me for this one UwU It was like… two o’clock, in the middle of the night?

Rumplestiltskin.

Forgive me for this one UwU It was like… two o’clock, in the middle of the night?

(Źródło: dopeydisney132)

thenamescatcher:

noxzaiden:

Leaves from the vine, falling so slow;

Like fragile, tiny shells, drifting in the foam.

Little soldier boy, come marching home;

Brave soldier boy, comes marching home.

sifuflameo
weh, some sweet rumbelle here :)

weh, some sweet rumbelle here :)

nagasexiii napisał(a): Ok I have a question. I've always wanted to paint without the lines but I cannot figure out how. So I was wondering if you could give me some tips on how you do it?

kupieckorzenny:

Oh wow, I didn’t expect anyone would ask me for advice :O I’m still a beginner, but I’ll try!

My method can be described by these steps:

  1. Draw lineart/sketch on a separate layer. 
  2. Pick the colour that will be the ‘main theme’ for the painting and fill the bottom layer with it. I don’t colour elements of the picture separately, it helpes me give consistency to the work.
  3. Create a new layer below the lineart and paint basic shadows. It’s the best moment to vary colours as much as possible (I use pressure sensitivity and don’t press the pen too hard, so the background colour is still visible).
  4. Once I’m done with the basic shadows, I outline some of the face features. For example, I pick a dark shadow and draw the jawline, or eyelashes, or highlight the nose bridge. I don’t add contour though! Just a rough stroke in the place where the shadow is.
  5. That’s the moment I switch off lineart layer. Shadows and lights from previous step work as guidelines in further painting. I continue building up shadows&lights and blending colours together until I’m happy with the result (or more often, when I feel that there’s nothing more I can do with it).

Obviously, this is a method that works for me, someone else will probably cry with despair seeing it. Not to mention the fact that I’m an amateur and my process will probably evolve in the future.

Some other things I consider worthy remembering:

  • In lineless (or sort of lineless) painting you use shadows instead of lines to show the shape and edges of an object. That means you should define where the light source is.
  • Use references. There is no better way to learn how lights and shadows work.
  • For more realistic result, you should use a lot of varied colours, even if they seem strange. Human skin may appear brown, but you shouldn’t avoid green, purple or blue.
  • Cold light generally casts warm shadows, warm light - cold shadows.
  • Be careful with grey and greyish tones, they are strongly affected by colours surrounding them.
  • Highlight is usually less saturated than midtone.
  • Some artists work in grayscale first, and colour it later. It may be a good idea since you focus solely on proper contrast. I prefer to swtich the picture to grayscale mode a few times during process to check if the values aren’t off.
  • You can also paint over your lineart, slowly merging the contour with the rest of the picture. Find the method that works for you.
  • Flip canvas often. I know it hurts, but the result is worth it.
  • When in doubt, use references.
  • When not in doubt, use references as well.
  • Always use references.

Some tutorials you may find useful:

I hope this helped a bit! Good luck! :)